Buddah Wood

Eremophila mitchellii

Eremophila mitchellii, known commonly as Buddha wood or false sandalwood, is a shrub or small tree native to Australia. Other common names include budda, sandalbox, and rosewood belvory. Buddha Wood is native to a variety of habitats in northern NSW and Queensland and is characterized for their drought, fire, frost and grazing tolerances. This species grows as a multi-stemmed shrub or small tree up to 10 meters in height with flaky bark. The leaves are linear to linear-lancelote and range between 2 and 6 cm in length and about 3 to 7 mm wide. It has white (occasionally pale pinkish-mauve), which occur in the spring, and to a lesser extent, in the autumn. Historically Buddha Wood has been used over the centuries by Australian indigenous people for its medicinal and cultural purposes. Traditionally indigenous people would use this plant for its anti-bacterial qualities to treat sores and cuts. It was also used both internally and externally as a decongestant, expectorant and analgesic. The leaves were also used to treat headaches and ease rheumatism.

Image Source: Buddah wood By Mark Marathon - Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=25467136

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Buddha wood has been found to be analgesic, insecticidal, termicidal, anti-microbial, a good fixative and balsamic attributes. It is a useful additive to massage oils for the relief of sore muscles and joints. Due to its woody aromatic qualities it is desirable for men’s toiletries.

Buddha wood oil can be found in many products including men’s grooming products, aftershave, perfumery, incense, insect repellants, termite treatments, massage oils, aromatherapy oils, candles.